C/S

© 2019 War of the Flea

THE HOW-TO MANUAL FOR ORGANIZING COLLEGE SPEAKING EVENTS

 

Disclaimer: This packet is a basic outline that provides a framework for a successful speaking event. It is intended for those who have little experience organizing such events, but can still provide an easy reference for those who are experienced organizers. This manual not only provides a framework for this particular type of event, but also outlines strategies for building coalitions that are necessary for future endeavors. The Left has been considered fragmented in recent years — it is imperative to step beyond this lull in our political history to build solidarity among local and regional groups.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1. INTRODUCTION

I. INTENT & PURPOSE

II. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

III. FINANCES

IV. GOALS AND FOLLOWING THROUGH

 

2. PUTTING TOGETHER A PROPOSAL

I. PROPOSAL/FUNDING LETTER OUTLINE

II. PROPOSAL EXAMPLE

 

3. CREATING THE EVENT

I. PRESENTATION FORMAT

II. SPATIAL CONSIDERATIONS

III. TIMEFRAME

IV. SPEAKER CONSIDERATIONS

V. SPEAKER ENTERTAINMENT/EXTRACURRICULARS

 

4. THE METHOD

I. DELEGATION OF RESPONSIBILITIES

II. STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS

 

5. BOLSTERING SUPPORT

I. UNDERSTANDING MESSAGING

II. LABOR ORGANIZATIONS

III. PROFESSORS

IV. STUDENT GROUPS

V. COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND GROUPS

VI. INVOLVING OFF-CAMPUS COMMUNITY AND GROUPS

 

6. RAISING MONEY

I. CALCULATING THE COST

II. CO-SPONSORING TO RAISE FUNDS AND HOLD EVENT

III. GARNERING FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY

 

7. MEDIA OUTREACH

I. PURPOSE OF UTILIZING THE MEDIA

II. TARGETING MEDIA OUTLETS

III. MEDIA CONTACT/RELATIONS

IV. FREE MEDIA

 

8. PRE-EVENT

I. MOBILIZATION TACTICS

II. SWEEPING

 

9. EVENT DAY

I. PUBLIC RELATIONS

II. MORNING CALL

III. PUSHING EVENT

 

10. POST-EVENT

I. PUBLISHINGS

II. MEDIA RELATIONS

III. INFORMATION COLLECTION


 

INTRODUCTION

I. INTENT & PURPOSE

The intent of this particular tour is to raise awareness of the unjust, unconstitutional, and racist laws that teachers are facing in Arizona. If you are unfamiliar with the struggle of Arizona teachers in the Tucson Unified School District, please view the following website so you can familiarize yourself with the campaign:

 

Save Ethnic Studies

The Arizona State Legislature is imposing xenophobic laws that have serious implications on the Xicano/Latino population. These laws range from forcing citizens to provide legal documentation to state police, which allows for profiling, to banning ethnic studies programs in school systems. The focus of this particular tour is to build solidarity with the teachers of the Tucson Unified School District who are fighting a ban on ethnic studies, which is being spearheaded by former Superintendent of Public Instruction and newly elected Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne. Tom Horne’s support of SB2281 is a maneuver to control the dissemination of historical information regarding injustices faced by the Xicano/Latino population in Arizona. To control history is to control future perspectives, and the perspective that Mr. Horne is trying to impose does not advocate for cultural pluralism.

S.B. 2281

This dangerous trajectory the state legislature is following paves the way for more racist legislation in the future, and provides a model for other states to follow. The value of this program is in its ability to provide a critical perspective to view United States history and culture, preparing students for college based material with college based material. Students enrolled in the ethnic studies program in Tucson have a dropout rate of 0 percent as of 2008; as a successful program, the structure and ethics of the course could be used in other areas to help improve the overall state of education—instead, it is being eliminated.

 

II. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

It may be obvious to you and members of your organization why your issue is important, but can you explain to the community why your effort is important? This helps keep you from becoming isolated. Building community support requires framing the issue in a way that appeals to the person or organization whose support you are seeking. When your allies trust you on a personal basis it’s much easier to work with them institutionally.

 

  • Stay in touch: Keep community supporters informed about your progress. Put out periodic updates.

  • Ask each organization to name a liaison with whom you can communicate effectively and consistently.

  • Reciprocity is the most important element in building and maintaining community support. When your allies rally and push for justice, join them! You can’t expect others to be there for you if you aren’t there for them.

  • Take time to meet with other leaders in the progressive community. Host lunches and get together.

 

III. FINANCES

Organizing a speaking tour and honorarium can be a daunting task.  When any person travels from a different state to tour a region at your request, it is your responsibility to ensure their time is well spent and profitable. This means having a full but not overbooked itinerary and maximizing funds generated so that the speakers can return to their campaigns with financial support. It is crucial that student groups, community organizations, academics, and labor unions work together to make the speakers’ trip worthwhile.

 

The issue in sustaining the Save Ethnic Studies campaign comes down to money. The expenses of lawyer fees, unpaid leave, and office rent are difficult for the ethnic studies teachers to support. The presentations that these teachers make are crucial to the maintenance and expansion of their campaign.

 

IV. GOALS AND FOLLOWING THROUGH

Before going in-depth as to the mechanical process that must be satisfied in putting on this event, let’s take a look at the broader goals we are trying to accomplish:

 

  • Raise money for the speakers’ organizations to benefit their campaigns at home

  • Bolster regional support from unions, professors, community members, student groups, and local media

  • Maximize event attendance for exposing the injustice of the Arizona State Legislature and Tucson Unified School District  

  • Spark interest in your speakers by utilizing social, television, and print media

  • Garner base support post-event

 

Goals in organizing should be attainable and realistic, but challenging. Commitment is half the battle; often, necessary tasks are not accomplished because there is a lack of commitment. Spread out responsibilities and tasks among the people with whom you are working so that you are not scrambling right before the event, trying to accomplish tasks that should have been done early in the campaign.  A timeline is one of the best ways to make sure that group members know to what tasks they are assigned, and follow through is crucial when ACTION POINTS NEED TO BE ACCOMPLISHED!

1) Set Action Points

When setting goals it is important to start at the beginning, not the end. Don’t identify your goals first. Start with all the information you have, some broad ideas of what you would like to accomplish, and your people-power. Once compiled, begin to hack away at the bulk of data until reasonable goals can be set. Remember to keep your event in mind—it isn’t about personal goals, it is about the goals of your organization/event. Think of it as a funnel system; at the top there is a lot of information and ideas, as you move down the funnel those ideas become more concentrated, and when you reach the end you have a set of clearly defined goals.

2) Deadlines

Deadlines are a constant theme in every kind of media. People want information, and all information is time and situation specific; it is the same within community organizing and media outreach. After ACTION POINTS have been established, set dates by which you will have accomplished each goal. Remember: Don’t be too hasty, i.e., take the time to do a quality job with your project.

3) Indicators of Performance (IOPs)

After ACTION POINTS and DEADLINES are put into place IOPs need to be set for each ACTION POINT. An IOP is exactly what the name entails, i.e., indicators of (how you did on your) performance (i.e., your ACTION POINTS).

PUTTING TOGETHER A PROPOSAL

Let’s take a look at an outline and sample proposal to get an idea of all the costs that will be incurred and how your organization will contribute to generating funds.  

I. PROPOSAL/FUNDING LETTER OUTLINE

1) 1st paragraph: Give your name, the name of the organization you are representing, and the total amount of money you are requesting.

2) 2nd paragraph: Write a brief description of the event and why it is being held.

 

3) 3rd paragraph: Write about the speakers; give their credentials, etc.

 

4) 4th paragraph: Explain who else is working with you and what money you have gathered from other sources.

 

5) 5th paragraph: Close by reiterating the importance of the issue and a statement about how the university student body will gain access to important information by collaborating with you.

 

II. PROPOSAL EXAMPLE

 

Xicano Development Center Worker to Worker, Worker to Student Speaking Tour

Project Budget

 

Personnel Expenses                                                         Costs

 

Xicano Development Center                                             $12,250

 

In Kind Contributions (Volunteer Contributions)

 

2 Personnel

 

240 Hours per person

 

Note: XDC in kind contributions are for grant and capacity building for our organization. We do not receive funds from you for this purpose. This is only an example of how a 501c3 non-profit operates.

 

Speakers Honorarium                                                      $10,000

10 events at $1,000

Non-Personnel Expenses                                                Costs

Gas                                                                                     $500

Flight                                                                                  $1,500                                                         

Lodge                                                                                 $1,400

Per-diem                                                                            $800

Tie-Global Intermediary                                                   $800

Total Program Expense                                                   $5,000


 

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Speaking Tour Budget Narrative

 

Personal Expenses

The Xicano Development Center (XDC) will provide 2 interns as in kind contribution volunteers who will organize a speaking tour. In organizing this speaking tour, interns will spend in total 480 hours at an in kind hourly rate of $25.00. The cost of organizing appropriate speakers will be remitted to Tie Global at a cost of $800. The Xicano Development Center will charge a total of $5,000 dollars from honoraria received by the speakers.

 

Non-Personal Expenses

The cost of vehicle transportation to 10 different speaking engagements will require $500 for gas. The flight for 2 speakers from Mexico will cost approximately $1,500. Lodging for the speakers and tour guides over a 7-day period will total $14,000. Over a 7-day period, a per diem cost for food and amenities will cost $800. An honorarium of $10,000 will be expected from all 10 universities that host the speakers ($1,000 per engagement).  

       

Final Result

The Xicano Development Center will ask for $12,000 in funding from federal grants for operational costs. The Xicano Development Center will ask for $1,000 honoraria from each university/organizational member to cover costs for personal and non-personnel expenses.

 

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Now let’s see how that breaks down by university. In total we hope to raise $10,000 for the speakers by asking for a $1,000 honorarium from each university. After non-personnel costs are incorporated, the cost for the whole tour is $15,000. Since we are visiting 10 universities, this breaks down to a minimum of $1,500 per event minimum. However, we want to generate as much as possible for these struggling organizers, so bid high. When asking the university for money it is easier to bargain down than bargain up.

 

The proposal should give a brief history of the speaker, but, most importantly, it should clearly state the money and other requirements for the event.  Again, the amount requested should be higher than the target amount! If you realistically think a school can give $2,500, then initially ask for $3,500. As previously stated, you can always bargain down, but it is much harder to bargain up. Develop a clear, systematic structure based on communication with and participation of local affiliates. Set goals for affiliate participation in the mobilization structure.

 

CREATING THE EVENT

In planning an event, it is best to work your way from big to small. Start with broad ideas as to what the event should look like in its final form, and then work out the details afterward. In any case, you should have some idea of what the meeting structure will look like as part of the pre-event work, which we will go over in a subsequent section. Here are some questions and tips that can get you started on imagining the final product in the early stages.

 

I.  PRESENTATION FORMAT

What form does the presentation take? Town hall meetings, academic panels, and community center gatherings are common political mediums. If the event takes the form of a panel, it may be best to have the panel members, including professors, meet prior to the event to discuss the structure of the meeting and drum up topics on which they may focus.

 

II. SPATIAL CONSIDERATIONS

There needs to be room for a presentation, an open forum, and, depending on the type of function you are hosting (town hall meeting, academic panel, etc.), room for local community members, scholars, and coalition members to speak.

 

III. TIMEFRAME

The main event should run no less than an hour, and no longer than two hours. Visualize the final product in a step-by-step sequence, so that when contacting local speakers you will know how they fit into the structure.

 

IV. SPEAKER CONSIDERATIONS

Will the speaker be obligated to make multiple presentations? Does the speaker need any special equipment for the presentation?

 

V. SPEAKER ENTERTAINMENT/EXTRACURRICULARS

Keep in mind that the Save Ethnic Studies teachers will be in your city for an entire day. Would you like to arrange breakfast or lunch meetings? During these meetings it is beneficial to have the speakers meet with members from your coalition. The entire day should be productive, but not overbearing. Leave time between functions for the speakers to recuperate. They will be on the road for nearly a week, which can be extremely draining.

 

THE METHOD

I. DELEGATION OF RESPONSIBILITIES

Attempting to equally share all of the workload in all areas during any kind of organizing endeavor will only lead to moderate gains toward goals. It is necessary to delegate responsibilities to certain individuals in order to maintain quality work and effort. When certain jobs/positions are assigned it can allow those people to specialize in and know their work-load. Examples:

-Media Outreach: In charge of sending press releases out to the media and following up

-Media Relations: “Spokesperson” This is your go-to person for interviews and speaking with the media, that way your message and be clear and consistent

-Journalist: Record, Write, Film, and Photograph the event from beginning to end


 

II.  STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS

This is a general step-by-step process that you should be considering throughout the campaign. As the packet continues, you will better understand the mechanical process in achieving these objectives.

 

1) Establish Your End Goal

Think broadly. An example for this particular event would be: To organize a speaking event hosting teachers from the Save Ethnic Studies campaign with 100 attendees on 23 March 2011.

 

2) Outlining

Outline objectives that need to be accomplished in order for the event to be successful. This is a general goal that is expounded upon later in the packet.

 

3) Connecting

Compile contacts from previous events your group may have held. Identify professors, labor unions, student groups, community groups, and media outlets that would be sympathetic to the cause. Where you may be lacking in community ties, do research. You can often find information on the previously mentioned parties by Googling or referencing the university website.

 

4) Scheduling

Once you have started connecting with plausible co-hosts for the event, set up meetings where you can plan the best way to accomplish objectives. Though you may be spearheading the event, it is important to recognize input from others and involve them in the scheduling process.

 

5) Coalitions

 

At coalition meetings, frame campaign objectives into a timeline that spans from the first meeting all the way up to the event. Assign objectives to individuals in all groups. This takes the guesswork out of what needs to be done, and by whom. It also allows you to hold people accountable for not accomplishing their assigned objectives. DELEGATION is crucial to a successful campaign; remember, many hands make light work.

 

6) Propose

At this point, and after referencing the finance portion of this packet, it is time to create a proposal so that you may receive funding for the event from the university. When applying for funding with the university programming board, it is important to aim for a higher cost than for a lower cost. The speakers are putting a great deal of effort to be present at these events, and the more money they can generate, the easier it is for them to sustain their campaign. In addition, it is easier to bargain down than to bargain up.

 

7) Follow Through

Now that you have the ball rolling, it is important to maintain contact, and see the process through up until game day. Set up weekly meetings with your group, and bi-weekly coalition meetings. These meetings do not have to be long, but lengthy enough to re-cap weekly objectives, reference the timeline to monitor progress, and adjust objectives as needed.

 

8) Game Day

Be present. Enjoy and learn from the company for which you have spent a great deal of time and effort in organizing the event. The Save Ethnic Studies campaign in Tucson is a contemporary struggle against racism and cultural singularity in the United States. You are now a part of the struggle in bringing to light the injustices that Latinos face in the 21st century.

 

9) Maintain Contact

You have just mobilized a multitude of different parties to facilitate a speaking tour. PLEASE maintain these contacts and utilize the momentum built from this event. Whatever political endeavor you intend to pursue, you will most certainly be more efficient for it.

 

BOLSTERING SUPPORT

Effective grassroots mobilization must draw from and consolidate grassroots activism that already exists. If individuals and groups are to share the responsibility of meeting goals they must also play a role in the decision-making process. An important step in strategic planning is to set goals for building mobilization capacity. Launch activities that unite your movement and the greater community around key issues and inspire others to join the fight. Delegation is key. If you are not able to complete some tasks, coalition building provides you with a framework to accomplish overarching goals. The more work you put into coalition building as you begin, the easier organizing will be later.

 

I. UNDERSTANDING MESSAGING

Being present in person shows commitment, and it is harder to say no when you are looking someone straight in the eye.

 

How do you present yourself, your organization, and your event?

 

It is important to have this objective completed early on in preparation so that you are not scrambling to find other panel members as the event approaches.

 

This doesn’t really make sense--as we discussed, something’s missing, and I think it’s the actual objective itself; it needs to be listed here.

 

II. LABOR ORGANIZATIONS

The benefits of incorporating organized labor into student campaigns can be carried on and strategically utilized in the future. You are not just asking the organization for support, but engaging in a reciprocal relationship from which you can both benefit.

 

1) Who are prominent local and central labor councils in your area? For this particular campaign, time would be best spent targeting teacher unions and worker centers that may have experience with putting on similar events.

 

2) Where and when are meetings held? It is best to meet with influential members in person. The sooner you make contact with people who would be willing to support your campaign, the easier your job is in the long run.

 

3) Labor organizations can be a source of funding for paying the speakers. They can also notify their base, thereby increasing event attendance and furthering the message.

 

III. PROFESSORS

Knowledgeable academics always add credit and legitimacy to events of this sort. In targeting professors, we want to look for those who would be knowledgeable about ethnic and educational struggle. Feel free to target other professors that you think may be sympathetic to the Arizona teachers’ struggle. Many universities now have graduate employee unions/organizations, and working with the GEO/GEU can also put you in contact with progressive instructors. Aside from academic credibility, if the professor is well known, their presence is promotional in and of itself.

 

1) Who are outspoken progressive professors on campus? Identify them.

 

Have you worked with professors on other campaigns before? If so, contact them as soon as possible.

 

2) Where and when do these professors have office hours? If office hours are not a good time to speak to the professor, when could you set up another meeting?

 

3) Once the meeting time is set, propose how the professor would fit into the event. (Note: It is important to understand event structure before this question can be answered. Will the event be a panel, town hall meeting, etc.?)

 

4)  Professors will often give students extra credit to attend this type of event. Ask the professor if he/she would be willing to “reward” their students for attending.

 

5) Use the classroom as a promotional tool. Professors often allow students to give presentations at the beginning or end of class. These are known as “class-raps.” Ask your own teachers if they would be willing to give you a minute to discuss the event with the class. This also gives you a great opportunity to pass out promotional literature.

 

IV. STUDENT GROUPS

About two months before the event, begin giving presentations to key student groups.  This is the point where your coalition work is going to pay off. The success for events like this is measured in attendance. People are more likely to come if they are solicited face-to-face.   

 

1) Who are the groups that deal with these issues on campus? Or might have a peripheral interest in the issue?

 

2) What is the history of the group? Do they have a track record of supporting speakers like yours? Does it seem like they are trying to be better known?

 

3) Where are their weekly meetings? Attending these meetings and speaking directly to the membership is invaluable.

 

4) When should you start? This process should start as soon as possible. When you know you are going to be bringing this speaker you should start gathering information about student groups.

 

5) Why should you contact them? Student groups are the quickest route to raising money for incoming speakers. They have access to institutional funds and a legitimate way of asking for them.

 

V. COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND GROUPS

Involve the community!  Since we are inviting and are expecting community members to attend the talk, the community should also have a chance to commit financially to the talk.

 

1) Who should be approached? Anyone outside of the groups listed previously. Community members are important because they can and should provide the foundation of any long term organizing project.

 

2) What -

 

3) Where should you look? Draw from the immediate community. Talk to those individuals who live in the same town as you. Focus on your immediate surroundings first.

 

4) When should you start? Start immediately. It is best to get community members on the ground level of any campaign you might have going. Don’t wait.

 

5) Why as soon as possible? Scheduling is important. The sooner we get into people’s minds that this event is going to take place the sooner we get mental buy-in from the community.

 

6) How do you approach them? Invite community members to join the committee bringing the speaker. Usually we have some overarching organizing goal we want to reach of which the speaker is a part. Bring community members in as full partners and begin the education and building process that will contribute to the development of our base and its participation.

 

Get a list of supporters, donors, and alumni in each area or begin to create one by consistently using sign-in sheets at each event. Nothing can substitute for a well-maintained list. These people have already shown their interest once and will most likely do it again. They are active participants as opposed to passive participants who are simply absorbing information.

 

VI. INVOLVING OFF-CAMPUS COMMUNITY AND GROUPS - Needs to be better explained/written out.

How to build a community support list?

Targeting key community members.

Who are they and how do we identify them?

 

The more you can demonstrate a broad spectrum of support, the more visible this event will be to the broader community.

 

If an organization shows support, take the time to write a thank-you letter.

 

RAISING MONEY

I. CALCULATING THE COST

Keep in mind that some of this information will fill out as you proceed through the packet.

 

1) Event Cost

  • How do you plan to structure the event day? Will there be a breakfast meeting? Will food be provided at the event? Who will be providing it?

 

  • Is there a cost for you to rent out a room for the event? Is there the possibility of renting a room for free at your university? How many people do you expect to come to the event (so you may provide proper accommodations)?

 

  • What are the advertising costs to properly publicize this event?(We will revisit this later in the packet.)

 

2) Host Cost

  • How much can we expect transportation to cost, i.e., what form of transportation will the speakers be using? (Car, plane, bus etc.).

 

  • Where will you lodge the speaker? What are the costs for room and board?

 

  • How much money will be provided to feed the visiting speakers?

 

3) Money for the Organization

  • How much money can you provide the organization from the University and other sources to make this campaign worthwhile? We hope to see 1,200 per university in honorarium.

 

  • Keep in mind that the amount of money raised for the speakers must make this event and the speaking tour worthwhile. These speakers have come from another state, and it is crucial that they go back home with money to sustain their campaign.

 

  • Universities set aside large sums of money for events such as this. XDC has calculated the approximate cost of both personnel and non-personnel cost. Later on we will address the question of how to garner support from these different groups, but for now let’s go over the financial aspect of building coalitions.

 

II. CO-SPONSORING TO RAISE FUNDS AND HOLD EVENT

How to Identify sympathetic groups

 

III. GARNERING FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY

1) Unions are very top down.

1. Do you know someone in the local union?

2. If you do, get them to put you on the agenda.

3. If you don’t have these types of contacts, then you should contact the president of the local union directly.

2) Student Organizations

3) Community Members

4) Professors

 
MEDIA OUTREACH

I. PURPOSE OF UTILIZING THE MEDIA

-attracting attention to speaker/cause

-attracting attention to your group/goals

 

II. TARGETING MEDIA OUTLETS

When targeting the media it is important to first look close to home. What publications/stations have run stories similar to your cause? Does your campus have a newspaper? Are there any low-key, minority, alternative media outlets in your area? Essentially, identify the groups that you know will have interest in your event and get to them early. Afterward you can case the entire media scene and flood the field with information about your upcoming event.

 

1) Campus Media

When organizing an on-campus event the most viable option for coverage is college/university-based media. College print media, college radio programming, public television, and Internet media outlets can become an abundant source for attracting media buzz for your event. Look up school-funded programs as well as independent university-centered news groups. As fellow students they should jump at the opportunity to cover your event, due to ease of access to sources and information, so make yourself available to these groups quickly and directly. Making consistent contact with the student media can lead to connections later down the road, when students move on to other media outlets/organizations; establishing a relationship with them may lead to your group becoming a long-term “beat,” or source of stories, for your contacts. In addition, being geographically convenient, campus media could possibly cover any pre-event happenings you might put forth, and getting the word out about the event earlier will create more buzz for the actual event itself.

 

2) Television

 

3) Print

 

4) Radio

 

5) Internet

-social media (website, FB, twitter)

-online press

-blogs

 

III. MEDIA CONTACT/RELATIONS

1) Press Releases

-how-to

2) Pregame

-PR’s, contacts

 

IV. FREE MEDIA

This is called earned media by professional media consultants.  Often radio stations, especially public radio stations, will do free public service announcements (PSAs) to advertise the event.  Try to get free ads and articles in community and alternative newspapers.

 

Mail out the promotional flyer to all supporters on supporter lists—this is where having an updated community list can become very important. For every flyer that reaches someone at their home you can count on it being read by everyone that lives there. Mailing is a solid way of reaching into the homes of our supporters with vital information.

 

Place articles and free ads in union, church, and community center bulletins; this is most effective when used with the appropriate event. This action also presupposes the idea that the work of building this relationship is in progress or has been done to the extent you even know who to ask. Another suggestion would be to send out notices of the event to all Central Labor Council affiliates in the area if appropriate.

 

Do pre-presentation radio interviews to tease people into coming to listen to the full-blown speech – again, this suggestion is based on reasonable belief that you as the organizers either have found someone from the area with these contacts or that you have hustled and opened these relationships for yourself. Radio interviews are good but in terms of commercial radio are probably most effective the day of the event. Public radio is also a very good way of getting this type of info out.

 

PRE-EVENT

I. MOBILIZATION TACTICS

To maximize student turnout at the event target key student groups early in the campaign.  Give presentations to members at weekly group meetings. If you are not familiar with the campus or student leaders on campus, every university has an office for student life or student affairs. Student organizations are required to register with the university and the contact information is usually public information. Many times the list of student groups can also be found on the Internet.

 

II. SWEEPING

Right before the event several people should take flyers and walk around the area where the talk is being given. Approach people with the flyer and tell them the speech is happening now. Invite them to come and listen. Sweeping works.

EVENT DAY

I. PUBLIC RELATIONS

-PR again

 

II. MORNING CALL

-morning call

 

III. PUSHING EVENT

-pushing event

POST-EVENT

I. PUBLISHINGS

-Post publishing,

 

II. MEDIA RELATIONS

-keep media contacts

 

III. INFORMATION COLLECTION

The following list is data people should collect after the event.

 

# of flyers made

# of flyers distributed

# of people that attended each event  

# of people attending all events  

# of media outlets contacted

# of media outlets that published your event